Posted in Social Media by Digivate

Twitter is great for distributing a buzz. Its ability to spread news like wild fire is one of its acclaimed strengths and millions use twitter everyday for this very reason; to stay in touch with the latest trending topics and buzz stories.

American Clothing company Gap found out through twitter this week about a new apparent weakness of their brand; their new logo.

The launch disclosure of the new brand logo was quiet. I corrected myself on the term ‘launch’ because the whole event seemed less fan-fare and more under the radar. The logo change didn’t appear on any press releases, ad campaigns or billboards; it just appeared on their (American) site.

Whilst the marketers at The Gap seem to have fiddled around with photo shop for a few minutes and designed a new company logo which is as bland and uninspiring as a pair of chords and a white t shirt, there is the possibility of something a little cheekier coming out of The Gap HQ.

Whilst the new logo was met with universal disdain, “This new Gap logo sha. WHAT were they thinking? *confused look*,” said IsokenObsidian (one of the more conservative criticisms to arrive on the trending twitter topic), there is a growing school of thought (again, through twitter and the blogosphere) that the design was purposefully underwhelming.

As a branding exercise, Gap and its new logo was revolutionary rather than evolutionary. There was no explanation or statement as to why there was a new look. The lack of background information worked in a way to intensify the brands odd decision; cue the shock, outrage, disappointment, <insert derogatory comment here>, that followed.

On the brand’s Facebook page, Gap now says it is planning on crowd-sourcing the project to collect the public’s ideas. The brand still insists they like their own creation but are willing to “see other ideas”, but perhaps this was the plan all along, or not. As a marketing exercise, it worked a treat, though we are still unsure whether it was achieved through wisdom or naivety. Either way, people are now talking about ‘The Gap’ again.

The coverage it has received already is remarkable and notches points on the pillar of effective viral and social media campaigns (whether it was intentional or not).

Any thoughts?

Leave Comment

* Required field